BALTIC, Gateshead NE8 3BA

Animalesque / Art Across Species and Beings

Amalia Pica, Yerkish, 2018. Courtesy the artist and Herald Street Gallery. Animalesque / Art Across Species and Beings, BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art 2019.

The curator of the show, Filipa Ramos, says that the starting point is Deleuze’s text 'Becoming-Animal', but it goes beyond the theory. Deleuze, while writing about Francis Bacon, states that between human and animal, there is a deep identity, a zone of indiscernibility, that is more profound than any sentimental identification. Review by Gulnaz Can

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Mother’s Tankstation, 31-43 Watling St, Usher's Island, The Liberties, Dublin 8, D08 NP48, Ireland

Niamh O’Malley: Placeholder

Placeholder, installation view

玉溪西元棋牌The first work you encounter on entering mother’s tankstation to see Niamh O’Malley’s ‘Placeholder’ is ‘Gather’ (2019), a balance of strength and delicacy with its coloured glass cuboids that are pierced and supported by a steel bar. This is the only ‘old’ work in this new exhibition and it is hardly old at all having been shown late last year in O’Malley’s ‘handle’ in Dublin’s RHA. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave, Seattle, WA 98104, USA

Agnieszka Polska: Love Bite

What the Sun Has Seen (still)

What if the sun spoke back to the world? Agnieszka Polska’s videos ‘The New Sun’ and ‘What the Sun Has Seen’ (both 2017) conjure this ecological encounter at the Frye Art Museum in Seattle, exhibited for the first time in the U.S. in the exhibition ‘Love Bite’ and curated by Amanda Donnan. Review by Laurel V. McLaughlin

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ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Cameron Rowland: 3 & 4 Will. IV c.73

Caption information below

玉溪西元棋牌Cameron Rowland’s first solo exhibition in the UK, ‘3 & 4 Will. IV c.73’, uses the provenance of objects, language, and laws, to underscore the artist’s research into the afterlife of slavery. Making various references to cultural theorists such as Saudiya Hartman, the work supports the contention that the abolition of slavery was a nonevent. Review by Sarah Hughes

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15th Fotonoviembre International Photography Festival, TEA Tenerife Espacio de las Artes and other venues

Myths Of the Near Future

Ann Lislegaard, Installation View ENTANGLEMENT, TEA Tenerife

玉溪西元棋牌‘Myths of the Near Future’ was the chosen theme and title of the 15th Fotonoviembre International Photography Festival directed by Laura Vallés and held at TEA Tenerife Espacio de las Artes and various other art venues in the Canary Islands. From the outset, the ambition was to reach out beyond the confines of photography in order to rethink the theory of the image and its limits, the places where it rubs up against other disciplines of knowledge like philosophy, sociology and anthropology. Review by Néstor Delgado Morales

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Charleston House, Firle, Lewes East Sussex BN8 6LL

Shani Rhys James: tea on the sofa, blood on the carpet

Shani Rhys James: tea on the sofa, blood on the carpet, Charleston, 1 February - 19 April 2020

玉溪西元棋牌Welsh artist Shani Rhys James’ portraits are brutally honest and emotionally charged. Many of the paintings in the exhibition draw on Rhys James’ childhood memories or explore her uneasy relationship with her mother. In ‘Blue Top’ (2013), the woman is depicted in early middle age, looming large above her small daughter, while in ‘Glass of Water’ (2017), she lies hunched against her pillows after suffering a stroke late in life. In both large paintings, the woman’s dark eyes stare out from the canvas – pupils which, on closer inspection, resolve from black into impasto swirls of purple, blue and green. Review by Anna Souter

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玉溪西元棋牌John Hansard Gallery, 142-144 Above Bar St, Southampton SO14 7DU

Larry Achiampong: When the Sky Falls

Larry Achiampong, When the Sky Falls, installation image, John Hansard Gallery, 2020.

玉溪西元棋牌‘When the Sky Falls’ presents works that explores the concept of Sanko-time, a term coined by Achiampong that is taken from the Ashanti word ‘sankofa’. ‘Sankofa’ is associated with the proverb: "It is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten.” Achiampong’s work is centred on such revisitations, using moments in his past to reflect upon the realities faced by African diasporic communities as a result of colonialism and its enduring legacies. Review by William Rees

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玉溪西元棋牌The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

Gabriel Kuri: spending static to save gas

spending static to save gas, 2020, installation view

There is a comforting routine to visiting exhibitions in Dublin’s Douglas Hyde Gallery - you enter the foyer and walk past the main desk to the top of the staircase, which gives a sweeping preview of the work as you descend into the gallery’s main space, your foot hitting the same spot each time. This comfort has been removed by Gabriel Kuri’s radical structural intervention ‘spending static to save gas’ (2020), featured in his exhibition of the same name. Review by Aidan Kelly Murphy

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Stills: Centre for Photography, 23 Cockburn Street, Edinburgh, Scotland EH1 1BP

Women Photographers from The AmberSide Collection

Women Photographers from The AmberSide Collection at Stills: Centre for Photography.

This exhibition brings together works from The AmberSide Collection, works made and gathered by a collective originally born in London over 50 years ago and based in Newcastle since the late 1970s. Since then, the group has charted documentary photography in the United Kingdom and further afield, through their own photography or through work acquired, with a focus on images highlighting socio-political situations. These range from depicting the council estates of the North East to wider global scenes, always from a left leaning stance. Review by Nicola Jeffs

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玉溪西元棋牌Castor Projects, Enclave 1, 50 Resolution Way, London, SE8 4AL

Habitual

Installation view

玉溪西元棋牌Entering the gallery through the small front door, the audience is directed towards the exhibition through a segue into a seemingly empty, light grey space with a lonesome bench and a large wooden structure in the corner. At this point there is still no sign of any art in an exhibition of 19 artists. However, instead of a conventional commercial group exhibition, ‘Habitual’ unfolds within the theatrical setting of a compulsive collector’s storage solution. Review by Sonja Teszler

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Bosse & Baum, Unit BGC, Ground Floor, Bussey Building, 133 Rye Lane, SE15 4ST

Candida Powell-Williams: The Gates of Apophenia

Candida Powell-Williams, Gates of Apophenia, installation view, Bosse & Baum, 2019.

Candida Powell-Williams’ installation, at Bosse & Baum in South London, feels like a series of frustrated movements: you move into, through, and around; there are loops that fail to revolve. The show is based on the tarot, and these movements act as invocations to interpret, and to delve into the symbols at play. In the way of both movement and interpretation, the idea of resolution is repeatedly engaged and refused in kind. Review by Harriet Smith Hughes

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Kettle's Yard, Castle St, Cambridge CB3 0AQ

Linderism

Glorification de l'Elue

玉溪西元棋牌Beyond the punk façade of the artist known just as ‘Linder’, there is an intricate weaver of narratives and miner of myths to be found. Kettle’s Yard’s sensory and expansive retrospective makes this apparent. Review by Clare Robson

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